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Michael Taylor

I am a heterosextual who is interested in Queer Theory. It seems to me, as a student of creative writing that my particular bent is social and anthropological. I'm simply trying to understand what your view is on homosexuality. Why refrence the murder? I don't mean to sound trite, Stanton is a great writer in my opinion and I respect your expert opinion and obvious respect for the author. It is difficult to communicate good fiction with so poor data on sexuality, our customs, culture, and other social ways. In a very real way, queerness is very misused and misrepresented in writing by heterosexual writers like me. I am trying to improve my short story's and other fiction. Please accept my apology if I have offended you or made this question too wordy. But social theory is pretty dry. I like readings,your responses and information. And Thanks for your response to the above question to historical fiction, I have found it helpful with my own work. Thanks again, Michael Taylor

Mike

One of my favorite writers , Tim Powers, wrote the excellent DECLARE, which combines historical fact with cloak and dagger fiction elements and uses the supernatural to explain why certain major events from WWII through the latter half of the cold war happened the way they did.
It's a great read.
In his book, key "real life" figures only stop in for a brief moment but the timing of the story follows historic timelines very closely - firebombing London, Nazi occupation of Paris, building the Berlin Wall, etc. He seems to use history to his advantage, weaving his story within the existing events, instead of deviating into an alternate time-dimension. Not that there's anything wrong with that...

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Some of My Books

  • : The Fall of the Republic

    The Fall of the Republic
    In a parallel timeline, 1990s America discovers the chronoplanes: parallel worlds at different points in history.

  • : Rogue Emperor

    Rogue Emperor
    The hijacking of the Roman Empire, 100 AD, by 21st-century Christian fundamentalists, in the second of the Chronoplane Wars novels.

  • : The Empire of Time

    The Empire of Time
    My first novel, published in 1978, but the last in the Chronoplane Wars trilogy.

  • : Gryphon

    Gryphon
    "Write a space opera," my editor said. So I did, with some nanotech thrown in.

  • : Tsunami

    Tsunami
    A companion novel to Icequake, set mostly in California.

  • : Icequake

    Icequake
    A disaster thriller (Antarctic ice sheet surges into ocean), dated but still fun.

  • : Eyas

    Eyas
    Originally published in 1982, and still the novel I'm most proud of.

My Blogs

Read The Tyee

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