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Brett

As the _Cambridge Grammar of the English Language_ explains, there used to be a fully functional subjunctive mood in English that had both present and past tenses. The only vestige of the "past-tense subjunctive" that is in any way distinguishable from the regular past tense is the 'were' shape of the verb 'be' in the first and third person singular. Because of the extremely limited scope of this usage, the CGEL suggests that it has come unglued from the "past subjunctive" and proposes that we simply call it an 'irrealis' form. The "present subjunctive", in contrast, is alive and well and may be used with any verb. It is formed using the plain form as Crawford has explained above.

Murphy

Unlike the indicative mood, which has six tenses, the good old subjunctive has four.

Murphy

Here's a sentence that contains TWO subjunctives: IF I HAD BEEN BROOKLYN'S MANAGER BACK THEN, I WOULD HAVE WALKED BOBBY THOMSON.
The subordinate clause contains a past perfect subjunctive, while the principal clause houses a simple past subjuctive with, of course, a present perfect noun infinitive as its direct object.

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